A Buyer’s Guide to Countertop Convection Ovens
A Buyer’s Guide to Countertop Convection Ovens
Camping Cooking Equipment -- Dutch Ovens The camping equipment you use for cooking cannot be adequate without the standard of camping that is which is the Dutch Oven. When you are looking at the market for the oven, there are numerous options for a new oven but I'd like to help you pick an oven that can perform well for you and is something you will leave to your children. I know of ovens that are over 100 years old, handed down from generation to generation. Make sure your oven is in good condition and you can too. Selecting an Oven So, what is a Dutch Oven? What is it? Dutch Oven is a round pot used for cooking. The pot is used to hold heat for cooking the food similar to an oven. Generally, there máy hút mùi are two types, kitchen and camp. This model for kitchen is made for using your oven at your home and cooking. The metal is less thick and on the lower part is flat. It is camp-style, stronger and has a thicker wall and includes legs. These legs are used to lift the oven off the ground so that you can place charcoal underneath it. Camp ovens are made from two metals, iron and iron. Aluminum is lighter in weight (7-10lb) and is easier to maintain since it isn't rusty. Aluminum ovens are great for canoeing, or any other type of camping where weight is an issue. However, aluminum ovens don't retain heat in the same way and could cause uneven cooking. Iron ovens are heavy (15-20lbs) and require seasoning to guard against corrosion. Iron ovens are ideal for normal camping as they can hold heat for longer and allow cooking to be more uniform. I recommend using an iron oven for family camping since the majority of the cook books will take an iron oven as the basis and weight isn't a concern for drag and campers. After you've determined what metal you'll need You must choose the right size. Ovens come in sizes that are standard and deep heights. Standard ovens cook the food's center quicker than a deep oven. Utilize a standard oven for quick cooking and one that is deep for slower cooking like rolling out rolls to brown. When you first start I would suggest you get the standard size, as that is what the recipe will require. The oven's dimensions vary too. Large ovens equal more food. When you first start cooking I recommend a 14 inch oven. The oven must possess other common features for the camp Dutch Oven. First, the lid should have a raised lip to keep the coals in place on top. This allows you to heat the food above. Also, a handle loop for this main cooking pot and smaller handle for your lid. Make sure you don't buy lids with handles for a "frying pan. Seasoning The first step is to read the directions on the back of your Dutch Oven. Some Dutch Ovens come with seasoned food and don't need you to do it. If the new oven you purchased is similar to this, follow the directions provided with it to prepare it for use. If you do need to season your new oven or refresh an old oven first, wash the oven. Your new oven will have protective coating that will keep its Dutch Oven from rusting during transport. Old ovens that have rust spots must have the metal wool removed of the rust. After that, wash them with mild water and steel wool. Rinse well. Dry your oven with a towel when finished. Moisture is the enemy of your oven. While you are cleaning the oven, pre-heat your oven in the kitchen at 350°F. After your Dutch Oven is clean, put it into the kitchen oven for some time, best way is upside down with the lid placed on a different shelf. This allows any water to drain out of the oven. Turn on the Dutch Oven until it's just warm enough to touch with your fingers. This warming process ensures that all water has been removed from the Dutch Oven and allows the pores of the iron for the next step. With your warm Dutch Oven, apply a coat of oil. Choose a salt-free oil, such as olive oil or vegetable oil. Cover the entire oven in oil. Then, you can place it in the kitchen oven to warm for an hour. It is possible to leave in the Dutch Oven upright, but keep the lid closed so the air circulates. Remove the Dutch Oven and let it cool down slowly. Once it's just warm, apply another coat onto the Dutch Oven and put back in the kitchen stove again for 1 hour at 350 degrees. Take it off and let it cool down once more and after that, add the 3rd coat of oil. You now have two coats of oil in your bank and one last coat to be put on while it is warm. Your Dutch Oven is ready to use or store until your camping trip. The surface of your oven is non-stick and when you make use of your Dutch Oven, the surface will improve. You won't have to do this long seasoning process again , unless the Dutch Oven gets rust on it. Heating Dutch oven cooking is accomplished with coals. Therefore, the first step is to prepare an area for setting up the Dutch Oven. It is possible to use a fire pit, but I would prefer a metal oil drip pan set on the ground. The good ones made of metal are hard to find now However, make sure to check your auto parts store. A majority of auto parts stores carry oil drip pans, however they are plastic. However, I have seen a metal catchpan that is very shallow - almost like a large cookie sheet. Pet cages or lids for garbage cans work also. It needs to be larger than the size of your Dutch Oven and have some room to store extra coals. We want to use a pan to protect the ground and help with clean-up. Be sure to leave No Trace! Set the pan in a safe spot that is away from traffic or where children are playing and get the Charcoal Chimney. This is a metal tube for starting charcoal and is the most effective way to get started with coal. Personally, I'm not a fan of the smell of quick -lighting charcoal and I believe that the fuel smell is absorbed into the food. Once the charcoal is ready, dump them in your pan, but on the side. There should be plenty of room for your Dutch Oven. Here's an YouTube video on how to use a chimney.  

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